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9jamusik

9kjamusik helping up and coming artistes by giving tools to help them record songs free advertisements , make videos for them etc

Website: http://tinyurl.com/ctznxg
Location: http://www.9jabook.com
Members: 35
News Feed : Oct 27, 2011

From nothing to Something !

Drop your youtube video or upload your videos and audios to http://www.9jamovies.com !



Will you be the next Asa ?

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Comment by Roti on May 18, 2010 at 7:25pm
An opportunity now exists for Nigerian artists (Writers, actors, singers, painters, sculptors, etc.) to be able to showcase their creative works to the world and meet other artists from other parts of the world. You can make this possible by joining a New York (Brooklyn) Art Gallery which is about to open centers in Lagos and Abuja. As a member of this organization, you get opportunities to showcase your creative works of all types (Poems, Novels, Paintings, Sculptures, movies, songs, etc) to the world.
Comment by wEbOrIgiNaLiTy Ochefu on March 18, 2009 at 9:58am
anything new?
Comment by Jane Okinedo on March 7, 2009 at 11:03pm
Comment by Jane Okinedo on March 7, 2009 at 11:01pm
Comment by Paul "EFCC" Hawk Adams on March 7, 2009 at 12:23pm
Dhiwhy a.k.a “The Swagga king
Tags Dhiwhy a.k.a “The Swagga king
Comment by sl!ck on December 24, 2008 at 5:27pm
sup peoples its ur boi slick up in the building... av couple of hot joimts u mite wanna check out.... hit me up and let me no wat u fil about the songs.. but definitely u gon like 'em... stay glued... 1
Comment by Melanie~Jayne on October 16, 2008 at 12:23pm
For someone like me, that doesn't know about Nigerian music, who do you suggest that I listen to...???
Comment by Femi on September 22, 2008 at 12:07pm
What does A&R stand for?

Artist & Repertoire. The term was coined to describe the function of people at record labels who are in charge of finding and developing new talent.

Development typically includes finding the right material for the artist to perform if they don't write their own songs, hooking them up with the right producer, engineer, studio, etc., deciding which of their songs are the most viable, and shepherding the making of the record.

After the record is done, it's not unusual for the A&R person to be responsible for getting the other departments such as retail sales and radio promotion excited about the record so that they do their jobs well. If all the parts of the record company "machine" work well together, the act just might have a hit.

Today, A&R people seem to concentrate less on developing artists, and often look for artists that have "developed" themselves. It's not unusual for the boards of directors to look more at the bottom line and less at talent development. Hence, A&R people are under pressure to find hits, rather than finding potential hits and nurturing them until they bear fruit.

How do I get my music to an A&R guy?

The best way to get your music to an A&R person is to cause them to come to you. You can do that by building a fan base through constant touring and relentless self-promotion. Couple that with making, marketing, and selling several thousand of your own CDs, and it's likely that you'll show up on their radar. When you do, they'll call you.

Can you get through to them with an unexpected phone call? Very doubtful. If they took calls from every person who wanted to pitch their music to them they wouldn't have time to do any of their other work.

Can you send an unsolicited demo? Yes, but it will most likely come back to you or end up in the round file. A&R people are extremely busy, and generally listen only to the material that comes to them from a trusted resource such as a high-level manager, a publisher, a music attorney, and if you'll forgive the little plug — TAXI.

What makes an A&R person want to sign you?

Hit songs and "star" quality. Those are requisites. Beyond that, you can increase your odds by doing your own artist development and proving that the public loves you and is willing to plunk money to buy your CD.

Browse A&R Insider Interviews
Comment by Femi on September 22, 2008 at 12:06pm
I like this group cos ,my life is music.Let me first introduce my self. I am Femi Lawal by name, a young music business entrepreneur.I am the CEO Mega Points International(Africa's First Independent A&R/Promotion Company) a global talent scouting and music promotion outfit.

At Mega Points we offer consultative services on music business related issues.

Are you an unsigned artists,or do you wish to start a music related business and need guidelines on how to make money from music.Holla me at:08024088184 to book an appointment.
Comment by Femi on September 22, 2008 at 12:01pm
What's The Deal?

What's the deal with record companies, anyway? Aren't they supposed to be on the lookout for new talent? Why is it so hard to get them to listen to my demo? Geez, you'd think they weren't interested in hearing music at all!

Almost everyone who has tried to break through the walls of the music industry without some kind of "inside" help has found themselves muttering these questions. Sometimes it seems impossible to get anyone to listen at all.

It may seem like they're going out of their way to avoid you, but there are actually pretty good reasons why record companies no longer throw their doors open to the general public.

One, they were sick of getting sued. About twenty years ago, labels and publishers began to get hit with nuisance "copyright infringement" lawsuits by songwriters claiming their songs had been stolen by the big, bad companies. In order to even begin filing such a suit, the plaintiff has to prove "access" -- that is, they must show that the company had had an opportunity to hear, and then steal, the song. Simply mailing an unsolicited demo to a record company was enough to show that the company had "access" to steal the song, even if they never actually listened to it.

Two, 98% of all unsolicited material is garbage. It's true, believe me. Sure, there are some diamonds in there, but when the cost of going through it all is combined with the risk of getting sued for doing so, the companies decided they would risk missing out on a few "diamonds" to save a few clams.

Three, musicians are nuts. OK, not all musicians, but enough to terrorize, threaten, and/or generally harass and make life miserable for receptionists, secretaries and A&R people throughout the industry that in order to get some real work done, they had to stop taking calls from just anybody that decided it was time to quit their job and be a star.

And four, they still get tons of new material to listen to from people that they already work with. In fact, most A&R people don't have enough time in their schedules to listen to all the new music that is sent to them by friends, managers, attorneys, and other trusted sources. But at least they know that this material will be worth listening to, because someone is staking their professional reputation on it. And besides, these people aren't going to be telling them they know where their kids go to school if the company doesn't sign the band.

So where does this leave you? Fortunately, there are ways to get through the doors, it just requires persistence, dedication and commitment.

You can still try calling the labels. Be very nice to whoever answers the phone and politely request permission to send in a demo. Most will tell you to get lost, but some will say yes. Remember though, that even though they may let you send it in, your demo will be sitting next to a pile of stuff that is being personally recommended by someone they know. Which one would you listen to, if you were in their shoes?
 

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